Mar 5, 2014

Judge rules Chevron doesn't have to pay billions in Ecuadorian ruling

shortformblog:

  • $9.5B in damages won’t have to be paid to Ecuadorian villagers, as part of a ruling against Chevron that approved by Ecuador’s Supreme Court, according to a trial judge in Manhattan. According to U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan, there was clear evidence of corruption in the original ruling,…

(Source: reuters.com)

Mar 5, 2014
theatlantic:

Soon, Our Robot Baristas Will Only Brew Certain Brands

We American coffee-drinkers have known the Era of Starbucks and the Epoch of Sanka.  It seems, however, we currently live in the Age of the K-Cup.
And we’re about to discover everything that means.
Over the past half-decade, single-serve, instant-brew coffee pods—called K-Cups—have taken over more than a quarter of the U.S. ground coffee business. Last summer, the Wall Street Journal judged the K-Cup’s rise “unstoppable” and reported that product category was worth over $150 million. 
K-Cups and Keurig (the best-known brand used to brew them) are both manufactured by Green Mountain Coffee. That company—worth some $16 billion itself—owned the patents for its chalices of disruption, but they expired in 2012, and since then it’s had a problem.
It’s historically operated on a razor blade model: Its Keurig business makes real money not by selling machine brewers but by selling K-Cups. Now cheaper competitors have moved in. They sell inexpensive one-off cups and reusable, extensible cups—threatening the company’s business on both sides.
Read more. [Image:  Randy Read / Flickr]

theatlantic:

Soon, Our Robot Baristas Will Only Brew Certain Brands

We American coffee-drinkers have known the Era of Starbucks and the Epoch of Sanka.  It seems, however, we currently live in the Age of the K-Cup.

And we’re about to discover everything that means.

Over the past half-decade, single-serve, instant-brew coffee pods—called K-Cups—have taken over more than a quarter of the U.S. ground coffee business. Last summer, the Wall Street Journal judged the K-Cup’s rise “unstoppable” and reported that product category was worth over $150 million. 

K-Cups and Keurig (the best-known brand used to brew them) are both manufactured by Green Mountain Coffee. That company—worth some $16 billion itself—owned the patents for its chalices of disruption, but they expired in 2012, and since then it’s had a problem.

It’s historically operated on a razor blade model: Its Keurig business makes real money not by selling machine brewers but by selling K-Cups. Now cheaper competitors have moved in. They sell inexpensive one-off cups and reusable, extensible cups—threatening the company’s business on both sides.

Read more. [Image: Randy Read / Flickr]

Mar 5, 2014
You think 12 Years a Slave should win the Oscar? I think you mean ‘White Guilt: The Movie’. That’s really all that movie is.
First-year Business major, submitted by i-think-im-a-contra (via shitrichcollegekidssay)
Mar 5, 2014

(Source: badblueprints)

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